An analysis of stratification in society

Davis and Moore state: The most important positions are rewarded the most--the least important are rewarded the least. In general those positions convey the best reward, and have the highest rank which a have the greatest importance for the society and b require the greatest training or talent.

An analysis of stratification in society

John Gowdy writes, "Assumptions about human behaviour that members of market societies believe to be universal, that humans are naturally competitive and acquisitive, and that social stratification is natural, do not apply to many hunter-gatherer peoples.

Original affluent society Anthropologists identify egalitarian cultures as " kinship -oriented," because they appear to value social harmony more than wealth or status.

These cultures are contrasted with economically oriented cultures including states in which status and material wealth are prized, and stratification, competition, and conflict are common. Kinship-oriented cultures actively work to prevent social hierarchies from developing because they believe that such stratification could lead to conflict and instability.

A good example is given by Richard Borshay Lee in his account of the Khoisanwho practice "insulting the meat. The meat itself is then distributed evenly among the entire social group, rather than kept by the hunter.

The level of teasing is proportional to the size of the kill. Lee found this out when he purchased an entire cow as a gift for the group he was living with, and was teased for weeks afterward about it since obtaining that much meat could be interpreted as showing off.

According to David H. Turnerin this arrangement, every person is expected to give everything of any resource they have to any other person who needs or lacks it at the time. This has the benefit of largely eliminating social problems like An analysis of stratification in society and relative poverty.

While many such variables cut across time and place, the relative weight placed on each variable and specific combinations of these variables will differ from place to place over time. One task of research is to identify accurate mathematical models that explain how these many variables combine to produce stratification in a given society.

Grusky provides a good overview of the historical development of sociological theories of social stratification and a summary of contemporary theories and research in this field. In general, sociologists recognize that there are no "pure" economic variables, as social factors are integral to economic value.

However, the variables posited to affect social stratification can be loosely divided into economic and other social factors. Economic inequality Strictly quantitative economic variables are more useful to describing social stratification than explaining how social stratification is constituted or maintained.

Income is the most common variable used to describe stratification and associated economic inequality in a society. Social status Social variables, both quantitative and qualitativetypically provide the most explanatory power in causal research regarding social stratification, either as independent variables or as intervening variables.

Three important social variables include genderraceand ethnicitywhich, at the least, have an intervening effect on social status and stratification in most places throughout the world.

Some of these variables may have both causal and intervening effects on social status and stratification. For example, absolute age may cause a low income if one is too young or too old to perform productive work.

The social perception of age and its role in the workplace, which may lead to ageismtypically has an intervening effect on employment and income. Social scientists are sometimes interested in quantifying the degree of economic stratification between different social categories, such as men and women, or workers with different levels of education.

An index of stratification has been recently proposed by Zhou for this purpose. Gender inequality Gender is one of the most pervasive and prevalent social characteristics which people use to make social distinctions between individuals.

Gender distinctions are found in economic- kinship- and caste-based stratification systems. Entire societies may be classified by social scientists according to the rights and privileges afforded to men or women, especially those associated with ownership and inheritance of property.

Sex- and gender-based division of labor is historically found in the annals of most societies and such divisions increased with the advent of industrialization. Other differences in employment between men and women lead to an overall gender-based pay-gap in many societies, where women as a category earn less than men due to the types of jobs which women are offered and take, as well as to differences in the number of hours worked by women.

Racism Racism consists of both prejudice and discrimination based in social perceptions of observable biological differences between peoples. It often takes the form of social actionspractices or beliefs, or political systems in which different races are perceived to be ranked as inherently superior or inferior to each other, based on presumed shared inheritable traits, abilities, or qualities.

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In a given society, those who share racial characteristics socially perceived as undesirable are typically under-represented in positions of social power, i.

Minority members in such a society are often subjected to discriminatory actions resulting from majority policies, including assimilationexclusionoppressionexpulsionand extermination. For example, members associated with a particular race may be assigned a slave statusa form of oppression in which the majority refuses to grant basic rights to a minority that are granted to other members of the society.

More covert racismsuch as that which many scholars posit is practiced in more contemporary societies, is socially hidden and less easily detectable. Covert racism often feeds into stratification systems as an intervening variable affecting income, educational opportunities, and housing.

Both overt and covert racism can take the form of structural inequality in a society in which racism has become institutionalized. Ethnocentricity Ethnic prejudice and discrimination operate much the same as do racial prejudice and discrimination in society.

In fact, only recently have scholars begun to differentiate race and ethnicity; historically, the two were considered to be identical or closely related. With the scientific development of genetics and the human genome as fields of study, most scholars now recognize that race is socially defined on the basis of biologically determined characteristics that can be observed within a society while ethnicity is defined on the basis of culturally learned behavior.

Ethnic identification can include shared cultural heritage such as language and dialectsymbolic systemsreligionmythology and cuisine.Sep 05,  · Pneumothorax is defined as the presence of air or gas in the pleural cavity (ie, the potential space between the visceral and parietal pleura of the lung).

The clinical results are dependent on the degree of collapse of the lung on the affected side.

The Topics

Gender and Stratification. The study of gender and stratification is comparatively recent, being developed from feminist scholarship. The traditional sociological view is that the oppression of women is adequately covered by class analysis. Chapter 8 and 9 - Social and Global Stratification.

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STUDY. PLAY. Social stratification.

An analysis of stratification in society

a system by which society ranks categories of people in a hierarchy. Principles of social stratification. Social conflict analysis of stratification. rather than benefiting society as a whole, social stratification benefits some people and disadvantages.

The Division of Labour in Society (French: De la division du travail social) is the doctoral dissertation of the French sociologist Émile Durkheim, published in It was influential in advancing sociological theories and thought, with ideas which in turn were influenced by Auguste leslutinsduphoenix.comim described how social order was maintained in societies based on two very different forms of.

Broadly defined, social stratification is an important part of many areas of study in sociology, but it also constitutes a distinct field on its own.

Social Stratification: Meaning, Types, and Characteristics | Sociology ( Words)

Simply put, social stratification is the allocation of individuals and groups according to various social hierarchies of differing power, status, or. For centuries, sociologists have analyzed social stratification, its root causes, and its effects on society. Theorists Karl Marx and Max Weber disagreed about the nature of class, in particular.

Other sociologists applied traditional frameworks to stratification. According to Marx, the bourgeoisie.

Stratification - Stratified Analysis | ASQ